Cloth Napkins DIY

 

My brother made a request for cloth napkins for his birthday this year. It took me a while to find a fabric I was happy with, I found this one at a new quilt shop in Snohomish, WA. This cloth napkin DIY is super easy, beginner sewing project that make a wonderful gift for birthday, house warming, mothers day, holidays, anniversary, wedding or shower. Plus, cloth napkins are eco-friendly. Instead of buying disposable paper ones, you can use these over and over again.

Cloth Napkin DIY

Supplies needed:

I purchased two yards of fabric, washed it and cut it down to 18″x18″ squares. Two yards make 8 cloth napkins.

hemming ruler

rotary cutter and ruler

sewing machine

iron and ironing board

matching thread

pins

How to:

I used the little hemming ruler to measure and iron 1/4″, then fold that 1/4″ over and ironed again. I pinned the hem in place.

Stitch 1/8″ all the way around, I did a pivot turn at the corners.

Pivot turn. Make sure you tie off the threads at the end by pulling through to the underside. You  could also do a couple of reverse stitches at the beginning and end to ensure that they last a long time.

Finished napkins are about 17″ square. Perfect lunch sized napkins. Typically dinner sized napkins are 22″-24″ while buffet napkins are 27″, cocktail are 6″ while Hors D’oeuvres are 13″. So, if you want to create a whole collection of napkins you could plan on making the different sizes for different occasions.

I suppose if you wanted a more bohemian/ eclectic look, you could collect a bunch of coordinating fat-quarters and make napkins with those. But I like how these ones turned out, slightly modern with a little asian inspiration. If you really wanted to you could dye your own fabric and make napkins too. You could even make your own napkin rings to go with!

Quilt Block of the Month November

Quilt Block of the Month is where I feature and make at least one quilt block that I think represents the month. The blocks that I feature every month you can do any number of things with. You could combine them all into a quilt, or use them individually for projects like pillows or table runners. The goal is to use scraps of fabric I already have. I’ll try to stick to patchwork quilts with little to no paper piecing and applique blocks. Click the hyperlinks to see FebruaryMarchAprilMayJuneJulyAugustSeptember and October.

Quilt Block of the Month November

Quilt Block of the Month

Tom Turkey by bee in my bonnet. How can you not want to do a Turkey Block for the month of November??! I think its really funny. I found some more fall fabrics at Jo-Ann’s to add to my growing stash (I may have a bit of a storage problem now, oops). This one I may have to turn into a table runner focal point.

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Log Cabin by red pepper quilts. I wanted to do a log cabin block because November makes me think of that one Thanksgiving years ago when I was 11 and we spent the weekend at the family cabin, all of us, the whole extended family (25+ people) around a bunch of tables joined together. Unfortunately I had the flu and kept everyone up coughing but I still remember it being a lot of fun. There were all the usual Thanksgiving smells mixed with the smoke from the fire. Yum!

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Quilt Block of the Month March

Quilt Block of the Month is where I feature and make at least one quilt block that I think represents the month. The blocks that I feature every month you can do any number of things with. You could combine them all into a quilt, or use them individually for projects like pillows or table runners. The goal is to use scraps of fabric I already have. I’ll try to stick to patchwork quilts with little to no paper piecing and applique blocks. Click the hyperlink to see February.

Quilt Block of the Month March

This month the quilt block is a Shamrock, the pattern comes from Kim’s Big Quilting Adventure. I just did a single block, so you’ll need three 3.5″ squares, and one 1 x 5.5″ strip in green and ten 1.5″ squares and one 3.5″ square in white. For the borders you’ll need two 1 x 6.5″ strips and two 1 x 7.5″ strips, if you choose to do a border. There is also this clover pattern from Craftsy which I hadn’t seen until after I did the first shamrock. It involves more piecing and more green fabric.

Here’s how it turned out.

 

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This is another easy quilt block, similar in technique to the hart block from February. I used some green and white fabric I had in my scrap/ fat quarter stash to make this block.

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The other block I decided to do for the month of march was a woven block.

You’ll need a background fabric (I chose white) and 4 color fabrics.

Cut the white into 1.5″ squares, four of them.

Cut your color fabric into 1.5″ squares and 1.5″ x 2.5″ rectangles, do one for each color.

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Nevermind that my fabrics lined up here, I was scaling down the pattern I had and didn’t do the math correctly. If you lay it out the rectangles should look like they won’t work, but trust me they will work.

 

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Sew the small color squares to the white squares at 1/4″.

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Sew the color/white strips you did in the previous step onto the color rectangles also at 1/4″.

 

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See how its coming together now, sew the tiny blocks you made in the previous step together, and together again!

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There you have a relatively simple woven block. Add a border if you wish.

Hope you have fun making the Quilt Block of the Month for March.

Cord Keeper and Sunglasses Case

Today’s sewing projects were quick and easy, a cord keeper and sunglasses case. I made them to match my iPad case, Camera Strap and Birdie Sling tote bag. I’ve still got some of this fabric left, after all of these projects. At least its all coordinated nicely. My focus lately has been using scraps and fat quarters from my stash.

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The cord keeper by Leafy Tree Spot. I’m going to be making more of these for all the cords we have, okay well maybe not ALL the cords. but for sure my phone, headphones, and maybe some of my crafting equipment. Imagine the different scraps you could use up!

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It really is easy, even though Velcro is a real pain to sew, on the machine or by hand.

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The scalloped sunglasses case by Positively Splendid. I’ve got a few more pairs of sunglasses that need homes. I think I’ll also be making more of these as well. Although I think I’ll use a thinner lining material. A walking foot for the machine came in really handy for this particular project.

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Let me know if you follow the links for the tutorials on making the cord keeper and sunglasses case. I enjoyed the projects!